Individuals   50 of 6,656 results

DADeb Abbey
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Larry AbeleLarry Abele
SASimon Abrams
AAAnand Acharya
LALucy Acton
AAAndrew Adams
MAMelanie Adams
MAMegan Adlen
Philipp AebyPhilipp Aeby
Michael AgengaMichael Agenga
NANatalia Agüeros-Macario
CACamilla Aguiar Fontenelle
CAClaire Ahlborn
KAKASSMI AHMED

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117 Communications
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27Four Investment Managers27Four Investment Managers
22° Investing Initiative
3 Banken-Generali Investment3 Banken-Generali Investment
3 Sisters Sustainable Investments3 Sisters Sustainable Investments
3i (Private Equity)3i (Private Equity)
3i Infrastructure3i Infrastructure
3rd-eyes analytics AG3rd-eyes analytics AG
57 Stars LLC57 Stars LLC
::response - Sustainability & CSR Advice
A B S A GroupA B S A Group
AA Case for Coaching Ltd
A123 SystemsA123 Systems
A2AA2A
ABBABB
ABF Capital ManagementABF Capital Management
ABN Amro Investment SolutionsABN Amro Investment Solutions
ACA Equity PartnersACA Equity Partners
AACCA
ACEACE
ACEAACEA
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AEM TorinoAEM Torino
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AFLACAFLAC
AG Tire TalkAG Tire Talk
AGFAGF
AGF AssurancesAGF Assurances
AGL EnergyAGL Energy
AGL ResourcesAGL Resources
AGRICA EPARGNEAGRICA EPARGNE
AAI Asia Pacific Institute
AIB Investment ManagersAIB Investment Managers
AAIM Capital Flair Limited
AIM InvestmentsAIM Investments
AKVA GroupAKVA Group
ALAMCO (Asahi Life Asset Management)ALAMCO (Asahi Life Asset Management)
ALFA LAVALALFA LAVAL
ALKEN Asset ManagementALKEN Asset Management

Buzzes   50 of 11,255 results

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(https://gibam.com/insights/paint-the-shed-green)

As sustainability increasingly becomes a public and private policy imperative, the risks of merely creating an ESG bandwagon increase. As a result, the bandwagon cheerleaders are under political attack for greenwashing. Yet those attacks can undermine the very real foundations for well-considered sustainable investment programmes.

But using “greenwashing” and “ESG” just as labels for a political position trivializes the very real substance of the issue. At the time of writing the world is accepting that we face real challenges (climate change, wealth disparity, food security, and access to healthcare, among others) such that it is important to understand who is actually making a positive difference and those just greenwashing. This paper addresses just that.

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HSBC: ESG Sentiment Survey - A time of inflection

  • HSBC’s third ESG survey captures the subtle shifts in sentiment following ongoing global events and the tightening of the ESG regulatory landscape
  • The intention to incorporate ESG has reached an inflection point as it is now so embedded that there is less to incorporate in the future
  • Almost three-fifths of the respondents believe that rising costs will be a hindrance to the sustainability strategies of the businesses they invest in

Clients of HSBC Global Research can access the full report via the HSBC Global Research website or by contacting Wai-Shin Chan

HSBC are always being asked what clients are thinking and doing when it comes to ESG, so HSBC decided to launch a regular ESG survey. This third edition captures the change in ESG sentiment midst ongoing geopolitical and climatic events globally. A few of HSBC’s major findings are:

  • Regulation has a hand in nudging ESG behaviour, such as how ESG is reported, and this will accelerate the "refining of ESG", in HSBC’s view.
  • There is no guarantee that the sustainability strategy of a parent company affects the ESG strategy of a related fund.
  • ESG understanding continues to grow - but is there a limit to how high this could go?
  • Decarbonisation is still a key priority but watch out as water, supply chains, and also biodiversity rise up the environmental agenda.
  • Diversity and inclusion should remain a key social focus over the coming year, alongside corporate culture and leadership.
  • A typical ESG investment professional splits their time between understanding ESG issues, analysing companies, engagement, and regulatory compliance.

The respondents represent USD10 trillion in assets under management (AUM) across 329 institutions.

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(https://www.riacanada.ca/research/2022-canadian-ri-trends-report/)

RIA Canada: 2022 Canadian Responsible Investment (RI) Trends Report

The responsible investment industry is in the midst of a remarkable evolution, according to new data from the 2022 Canadian Responsible Investment (RI) Trends Report. Released today by Canada’s Responsible Investment Association (RIA), the report tracks the national trends and outlook for RI, which refers to investments that incorporate environmental, social, and corporate governance (ESG) issues into the selection and management process. 

  • This year’s report confirms that RI’s recent momentum is giving way to demand for sophistication and more vigilant reporting, signalling a maturing industry.
  • Over the past two years, the rush into RI claims has been met by forces both external and internal to the financial industry, including the reputational and legal risks associated with greenwashing and lack of clarity around ESG industry terminology and disclosure requirements.

 

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(https://www.spglobal.com/esg/insights/esg-investment-research/topics/post-cop27-ipcc-aligned-indexes-time-for-changes)

S&P Sustainable1: IPCC aligned indexes, time for changes?

Key highlights

  • To achieve a 1.5°C objective by 2050, the world has a finite carbon budget of only 300 Gt CO₂, according to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change.
  • The world can meet this carbon budget by reducing CO2 levels 12% each year from 2022 to 2050. • One simple, transparent approach to address this challenge is for asset owners and investors to consider Net Zero Carbon Budget Indexes that track this requirement and thus capture the cost of time.
  • Unfortunately, as the carbon budget shrinks with time, the objective becomes increasingly challenging. Decreasing 12% per year will become 20% in 2025 and 47% in 2028 to achieve a 1.5°C objective with an 83% probability by 2050.
  • With a Net Zero Carbon Budget Index, lower carbon emitters within each sector are selected and reweighted to reduce emissions 12% each year. A simple but transparent solution.

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(https://www.cargill.com/doc/1432219233265/2022-esg-report-all.pdf)

Cargill: 2022 ESG Report 

This report covers key areas which include: 

  • People & Community Impact, including building resilient communities and responding in times of crisis. 
  • Climate, Land & Water, with subsections on protect, regenerate, restore and innovate. 
  • Ethics & Compliance, promoting employee ethics and compliance. 

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(https://www.thekrogerco.com/wp-content/uploads/2022/08/kroger-co-2022-esg-report.pdf)

Kroger: ESG Report 2022 

This report covers key areas including: 

  • People, with highlights including 546 million meals for their communities, 98% of associates trained in personal safety and 94million pounds of surplus food rescued for donation 
  • Planet, covering climate, governance, strategy and risk management as well as a full emissions breakdown 
  • Systems, with focus on ethics & compliance, responsible sourcing and conservation & biodiversity.

 

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(https://corporate.target.com/_media/targetcorp/sustainability-esg/pdf/2022_target_esg_report.pdf)

Target: 2022 Environmental, Social and Governance Report 

Target's 2022 report covers key areas including: 

  • Environment - investing in circularity, climate action and responsible resource use 
  • Social - supporting our team members, board and workplace diversity and serving and strengthening communities 
  • Governance - Operating ethically and promoting and protecting human rights 

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(https://www.mfs.com/en-gb/investment-professional/insights/sustainable-investing/sustainable-investing-annual-report.html)

Find out about how MFS is engaging with companies as part of its approach to treating climate change as a systemic risk.

This report is in three parts. Click below to select each section:

ESG Integration and Investment Outcomes

Client and Industry Alignment

Corporate Sustainability at MFS

 

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(https://sustainability.adecoagro.com/en/reports)

See here for the 2021 reports, including:

Executive Summary

Brazil Sustainability Report

Argentina and Uruguay Report

GRI Handbook

Integrated Report

MSCI ESG Rating

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(https://main-bvxea6i-ftnqm4elsyhuu.us-4.platformsh.site/en/sustainability-reports/#report-2021)

This report covers the period from January 1 through December 31 of 2021 and was elaborated around the core topics of sustainability.

Toward the end of 2021, Minerva conducted a new materiality assessment to identify, prioritize, and define the most relevant topics that are material to ESG communication and based on industry trends, social and environmental challenges, and the perception of their impacts from the standpoint of its stakeholders.

The indicators presented in this report are based on the Global Reporting Initiative (GRI) standards, the Sustainability Accounting Standards Board (SASB) of the Value Reporting Foundation, and on the recommendations of the Task Force on Climate-related Financial Disclosures (TCFD). The report also draws guidance from other frameworks, such as the Coller FAIRR methodologies; the Business Benchmark on Farm Animal Welfare (BBFAW); Insight Disclosure Action through the Climate Disclosure Project (CDP); and the reporting requirements for the Corporate Sustainability Index (ISE) and the Carbon Efficient Index (ICO2) of the B3.

The scope of this report includes all units in Brazil, Argentina, Colombia, Paraguay and Uruguay.

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(https://www.parisalignedinvestment.org/)

This publication explores the progress that Paris Aligned Asset Owners signatories have made since the first asset owner net zero commitments were announced by the Paris Aligned Investment Initiative in 2021.

As the initiative’s first Progress Report, it presents an overview of the actions taken by signatories to implement their net zero commitments, as well as the work underway by the investor networks and their members to develop methodologies and support implementation.

The report is structured around the initiative’s 10-point net zero commitment statement which is signed by signatories on joining the initiative. The commitment statement covers a range of areas from target setting to stewardship, industry collaboration and policy advocacy.

The focus is on providing an analysis of the targets set to date, showcasing best practice and innovation in the range of strategies and approaches that asset owners have developed to reach their net zero goals.

The report will be useful for asset owners considering developing a net zero strategy or looking for inspiration, as well as external stakeholders that would like a better understanding of the initiative and how asset owners are taking meaningful steps towards supporting the net zero transition. 

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(https://www.unpri.org/download?ac=17445)

The Initiative Climat International (iCI) Net Zero Working Group was established to provide guidance on net zero and science-based commitments for iCI signatories. In partnership with consultancy firm Indefi, the group have produced the first in a series of publications intended to support the development of net zero strategies within private equity.

There is strong support for net zero across the financial sector, but the number of private equity firms making public commitments remains low. This does not reflect a lack of ambition from private equity but rather confusion over application to private equity and what public commitments may require.

So how can private equity investors get started? This guide introduces iCI’s new signatory roadmap. It builds on existing recommendations and encourages iCI members to commit to aligning with a net-zero trajectory and contributing to a low carbon economy.

About the report

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(https://www.triodos-im.com/dress-to-change)

In recent years, the clothing sector has increasingly come to be known for its environmental degradation and disregard of human and labour rights. To transform into a sustainable sector fitting a green, inclusive, and resilient economy, the fashion industry needs to move from a business model based on low value and high volume (fast fashion) to high value and low volume (slow fashion), and an intrinsically sustainable business purpose. 

As an investors we play an important role in the transition to a more inclusive and sustainable economy. Download this paper and find out how responsible investors can help the fashion sector move away from non-valuable products, non-durable processes and non-sustainable corporate business purposes and push it in a more sustainable direction.

In this paper you learn more about:

  • The unsustainability of the current fashion business model;
  • Slow fashion as an alternative for fast fashion;
  • How investors can help push the fashion industry in a more sustainable direction.

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(https://www.pimco.co.uk/en-gb/insights/viewpoints/sustainable-investing-in-local-currency-emerging-market-bonds)

Investor demand for bonds linked to environmental, social, or governance (ESG) objectives continues to grow, and both developed and emerging market (EM) issuers are responding. 

While the market for ESG-labelled bonds in EM local currencies is still in the early stages of its development, PIMCO believe the secular growth of EM local markets and rising supranational issuance will create attractive opportunities for investors to participate in the development of this nascent asset class.

  • The ESG ecosystem in EM has grown considerably over the past five years, broadening in size, scope, and complexity. Bolstering this trend is the increasing implementation of climate-related disclosure requirements, issuance of taxonomies and frameworks, and announcement of climate targets across EMs.
  • Hard currency issuance (i.e., in U.S. dollars, euros, or British pounds) has historically been the dominant driver of growth in the EM ESG space, but issuance in local currencies is quickly catching up, growing from $4 billion in 2015 to $83 billion in 2021. As of Q2 2022, issuance in local EM currencies was already 55% of total EM ESG-labelled issuance.
  • PIMCO see broad scope for these numbers to grow given that EM local markets are over six times larger than external markets, and since much of the ESG-labelled local issuance has come only from a few key geographies so far.

An allocation to emerging market local bonds may make sense for a wide range of investors given the potential for compelling valuations of EM currencies and attractive real yields versus developed markets. Given the ongoing development of the ESG-labelled EM local bond market, investors have another tool to access the sector in a sustainability-conscious way.

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(https://www.fidelityinternational.com/editorial/article/the-glory-of-the-grey-stuff-the-technology-changing-real-estates-carbon-future-cb7bce-en5/)

The real estate sector is on the cusp of a green revolution. From being one of the worst carbon offenders, the industry could soon transform into one of the great green success stories.

  • Concrete’s problems lie in the emissions generated in the production of its main ingredient, cement. If the cement industry were a country, it would have the third largest carbon footprint in the world after only China and the US, producing 2.8 billion tonnes of carbon each year.
  • For every tonne of cement manufactured, around 600kg of carbon dioxide is emitted.
  • This is equivalent to a first-class seat on a flight from London to New York. But despite its high carbon profile, cement is still the most used substance in the world after water. China, for example, poured more cement in three years (2011-2013) than was used in the US in the whole of the 20th century. 

Engineers from Imperial College London and the University of California, Irvine have identified interventions that could reduce the amount of carbon emitted by the cement production process to between 80 per cent and minus 50 per cent of current figures – effectively making the procedure a net-negative one that actively takes carbon out of the atmosphere.

Many of these technologies are still in their infancy, but as both producers and buyers get serious about their commitment to green materials through initiatives such as the First Movers Coalition, the real estate industry can turn from a major carbon emitter into something much more, well, constructive.

This makes sense for investors too, as greener buildings generate higher rents and stickier occupancy rates. It also future-proofs assets against coming regulatory changes. With these technological developments leading the way, a truly green future may be found in the grey stuff.

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(https://www.wellington.com/en/insights/esg-private-equity-trends)

Environmental, Social and Governance (ESG) factors are critical business issues for public and private companies alike. In Wellington Management's view, understanding and incorporating material ESG factors as early as possible enables more informed and strategic business decisions. Yet less than half of private company boards assess ESG-related risks and opportunities.

In Wellington Management's view, strong ESG practices can potentially help private companies:

  • Improve financial returns. Material ESG issues, such as climate risk, talent management, and board composition, can affect a company’s financial performance and long-term intrinsic value.
  • Establish stronger brands and wider competitive moats. It is increasingly common for consumers to reward companies with strong ESG practices. For instance, 66% of US consumers are willing to pay more for products and services offered by socially and environmentally responsible brands. There is also a growing recognition that a company’s ESG profile can affect its culture, regulatory risk, reputational risk, employee productivity, and ability to attract and retain top talent.
  • Draw a broader pool of investors. Asset owners and institutional money managers are now more focused on ESG. Crucially, ESG assets are projected to grow substantially in the coming years, both in absolute terms and as a percentage of overall assets. In the public markets, companies should expect to be held to higher governance standards, including by ESG rating agencies and proxy advisers.

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(https://www.nb.com/handlers/documents.ashx?id=6c1f1a75-d6a5-4df0-8bbd-3f38eaac7dce&name=key_considerations_when_navigating_the_net-zero_transition.pdf)

Eighteen months ago, Neuberger Berman mapped considerations for the industry’s forward path through the unfolding low-carbon transition (see Transitioning to Net-Zero Investment, April 2021). At the time, the Net-Zero Asset Owner Alliance had just added five members to their ranks, bringing the overall number of signatories to 42 owners, with a total of $6.6 trillion in assets under management. It was a crucial tipping point for net zero.

Since then, macroeconomic conditions and the political landscape have shifted dramatically. Rising energy prices and regulatory scrutiny of ESG and climate commitments have created a more challenging environment for investors aiming to decarbonize their portfolios. And yet, the number of new net-zero commitments keeps ticking up.

In this paper, Neuberger Berman present 11 key issues we believe asset owners should take into consideration right now—as well as the significant challenges that come with them—based on feedback from numerous well-informed clients and industry experts. The discussion spans all phases of implementing a net-zero commitment—from initially codifying it, to sharing progress with key stakeholders—and offers food for thought on navigating next steps.

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(https://www.leadersarena.global/single-post/why-are-esg-controversies-so-controversial-what-can-companies-do-about-them)

Leaders Arena: Why are ESG controversies so controversial & what can companies do about them?

Controversies – or news items related to perceived ESG missteps are part of the ESG data and scores provided by ESG rating agencies. While due diligence on ESG ratings information can be monitored by companies, controversies are often more difficult to tackle and are also at risk of being mismanaged, either because they are overlooked, or on the contrary, because they are misunderstood.

Their influence on a company’s overall ESG rating and potential impact in terms of company reputation and investability, should be carefully considered by companies. The authors explore the controversies element of ESG ratings and provide company guidance for how to address them through the implementation of an ESG ratings and controversies management plan.

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(https://justshare.org.za/media/news/climate-change/new-just-share-report-introduction-to-corporate-climate-lobbying-in-south-africa/)

Just Share: Introduction to corporate climate lobbying in South Africa

At the closing of COP27, United Nations secretary-general António Guterres was clear: the meeting did not adequately meet the ambitions required by the state of the climate crisis. He said, “Our planet is still in the emergency room. We need to drastically reduce emissions now, and this is an issue this COP did not address.”

Despite increasingly indisputable evidence of the effect of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions on the climate, and the urgent need to transition to low carbon economies, political leaders appear incapable of mobilising the necessary action to avoid the worst effects of climate change. One of the key reasons for this failure to act is corporate interference aimed at weakening and delaying action – otherwise known as negative corporate climate lobbying. In many instances this manifests itself in high-level public positions of support for the Paris goals but “closed-door undermining of climate action”.

Corporates engaged in negative climate lobbying are motivated by the need to protect their profits in a world that increasingly recognises that their products are the primary cause of harm to the environment, livelihoods, and human health and well-being. For some businesses, climate action threatens their relevance and therefore their survival, which explains the lengths their representatives will go to prevent – or at least delay – a transition to low carbon energy systems.

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(https://accesstonutrition.org/index/us-index-2022/)

ATNI: US Index 2022

The US Index is a benchmark comparing the commitments and performance of the eleven largest food manufacturers active in the US to deliver healthy, affordable food and beverages enabling consumers to reach healthier diets and to prevent hunger.

All companies assessed have now placed a greater focus on nutrition in their corporate strategies, and ten manufacturers in some way define what they consider “healthy”. Companies are making explicit commitments to reduce diet related diseases.  However, companies must now turn these commitments and policies into action. 

Despite the introduction of healthier varieties in some product categories by some companies, the combined product portfolios of all eleven companies – representing a sales value of around $170 billion in 2021 and accounting for approximately 30 percent of all US food and beverage sales – have not become healthier.

 

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(https://www.banktrack.org/download/banking_on_thin_ice/210202_banking_on_thin_ice.pdf)

This report provides an overview of the financial relationships between 10 major Nordic banks and the fossil fuel industry, as well as the policies the banks have in place to regulate their links to the industry.

 

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(https://www.research.hsbc.com/r/20/btlbwssqbkcm)

HSBC: COP27: Inconsistency - Sharm el-Sheikh Implementation Plan

  • Slivers of progress, not balanced, were achieved at COP27 as many contentious issues were left for future climate talks
  • The establishment of a fund for loss and damage came at the expense of raising ambition, with 1.5°C only "alive on paper"
  • HSBC think bifurcation is becoming trifurcation as climate issues evolve with global politics - leaving far too much to be done

Clients of HSBC Global Research can access the full report via the HSBC Global Research website or by contacting Wai-Shin Chan

Inconsistent progress: COP27 ended a day and half late with only faint outlines of progress across various climate issues after two weeks of bitter negotiations in Sharm el-Sheikh, Egypt. Various Parties were very close to walking away without a deal (Cover decision). In the end, >36 hours after the deadline, the key issue of a Loss & Damage fund was agreed. In HSBC’s view, ambition was not raised, the 1.5°C target is alive only on paper and other key issues such as adaptation (GGA) and finance (NCQG) saw progress by virtue of the passage of time, rather than any substantive decisions. There are many divisions within the global climate process.

Funding Loss & Damage: This was the dominant and most contentious issue at COP27 - it held up the start and finish of the talks. Vulnerable Parties fought to get sub-item 8(f) added to the agenda and refused to leave without a fund. It was agreed "to establish a fund for responding to loss and damage whose mandate includes a focus on addressing loss and damage" but virtually none of the details were agreed. The fund won't be operational before COP28 (see page 3 for more details).

Sideways ambition: There was no increase to the level of climate ambition despite the urgency (e.g. more severe extreme events, a diminishing carbon budget, rising temperatures). There was the very real possibility of 1.5°C dropping off the radar as the sense of urgency around 1.5°C was noticeably less apparent than in Glasgow. Wording around coal was identical to COP26 (i.e. not strengthened); the potential inclusion of fossil fuels and some form of "phase out/down" never made it into the decision (final or draft); HSBC note more mentions of "low-emission" energy than before (most likely referring to gas). To try to increase ambition, the UN Secretary General will host another climate ambition summit in 2023 (before COP28).

A plan to implement: Plans that are not yet operational mean delays to climate action as funding and investment remain implementation barriers. Human rights were on show at COP27, highlighting that a just transition involves consideration of age, gender, indigenous communities, and many others. In HSBC’s view, COP27 did little to accelerate the speed of transition at a political level, leaving ambition and action for future discussions. COP28 will take place in the UAE next year (30 November - 12 December), where the first global stocktake will take place and likely show just how far HSBC are from implementing the Paris Agreement and keeping 1.5°C alive.

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(https://2degrees-investing.org/resource/jumping-the-barriers-to-sustainable-retail-investment-in-france/)

2ii: Jumping the barriers to sustainable retail investment in France

This report summarises research (quantitative survey, bilateral interviews, focus groups, mystery shopping and a desk-study of a fund database) conducted by 2° Investing Initiative France to investigate the current situation regarding demand, supply and distribution of sustainable finance products in the French retail investment market.

The main results include:

  • On the demand side: a noticeable attitude-behaviour gap whereby positive attitudes of retail investors towards sustainable finance are not reflected in actual ownership of sustainable financial products. Across retail investors, beliefs and preferences regarding sustainable finance products are highly heterogeneous while (perceived) knowledge and trust is generally low.
  • On the supply side: a highly concentrated offer, focusing on a few sustainable strategies and ESG topics. This concentration does not reflect the heterogeneity of client preferences regarding sustainable finance products observed on the demand side.
  • On the distribution side: in the period before the new requirements to include a mandatory assessment of sustainability preferences in the suitability assessment, a tendency by financial advisors to apply an advisory process for potential clients that falls far short of these new requirements. Financial advisors were also frequently reported by clients and mystery shoppers to display a poor mastery of sustainable finance concepts and products.

Overall, the report reveals several critical areas of disfunction for the French retail market for sustainable financial products.

 

 

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